Lynda Blackmon – Youngest person to participate on Bloody Sunday

At the young age of 14, Lynda Blackmon was allowed to march from Selma to Montgomery.

Lynda Blackmon

In the height of the Civil Rights Movement, hundreds marched from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., in a nonviolent protest for voting rights. February 2020, Bay Area News 9 wrote these words sharing her story, her struggles and how she continues to live with the aftermath of Bloody Sunday.

“But the March 1965 demonstration was met with violence in what is now known as “Bloody Sunday.”

For Lynda Blackmon, the youngest demonstrator allowed to march that day, it’s still hard to talk about.

“I can’t forget those feelings to this day,” said Blackmon, who was 14.

She was hit twice in the forehead and shoved to the ground.

“I was running into a cloud of tear gas and this man was running, beating me, hitting me in my head,” Blackmon said.

The book Turning 15 on the Road to Freedom tells her story.

Blackmon said she became involved in the movement at 7 years old after her mother died.”

Learn about the women of the civil rights movement. They may not be household names but they are living history. Women have a story to tell. Learn their stories. This woman who walked with some of our civil rights giants had been through a tremendous ordeal at a young age. She had lost her Mother, her foundation, the person who loved and cared for her. For her to even participate in civil rights was a tremendous feat and a testimony to her mother, her tribe, her community. Learn the stories of everyday people in your community. It will change your life, change your perspective.

#womenshistorymonth #herstory #BloodySunday #LyndaBlackmon

I Am Not My Hair – Part 1

Recently, I’ve been thinking about cutting all my hair off. I actually shaved the sides with longer Locs on top. I wear it this way to work so that no one sees my shaved hair but often now wear it a ponytail or bun at home. It is a huge adjustment from my long, full Locs but I’m adapting. (check next post for past hair pictures)


When I read this story about the TSA machines possibly singling our Black Women because of their hair, I had a flashback!

When I transitioned from relaxed hair to natural hair, I wore different types of hair styles. However, working with corporate America and in the political system, it was necessary for me to remain conservative. In addition, I traveled – A Lot! I was in different cities and states on a weekly basis. Sometimes I drove, if my destinations were close enough. Most times, I was flying or catching the train. It gave me time to work 🧐

When they say this story is late, it could have been written more than a decade ago. No matter how conservative my hair, I was always stopped. And I was not alone. Any woman at that time who pioneered this natural phenomenon that we are experiencing today can attest to it.

One time, my braids were pinned back in a tight bun because braids were not considered professional or conservative at the turn of the century. I was asked to attend this meeting at the last minute. Because I had Bobby pins in my hair, they forced me to take them out and scan my hair. At the time, I really think they just wanted to touch my hair 😉 Black Hair always fascinates some.

If the TSA scanners are now targeting Black women, we must address this and address it now! I can only imagine what is happening to women today. I don’t travel quite as often as I did then, but I am always prepared for the pat down and hair check. It has become part of my life. I wonder, 🤔 will they continue to check my hair when I cut it all off. I suspect that they may!

I am not my hair!

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